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  • October 16Join Spanish Club for a Taco Fiesta on Wednesday Oct. 18 in room 89A. Bring $3.

  • October 16All Prospective National Honor Society members should stop by room 313 on Thursday Oct. 19 to pick up results.

  • October 16The Choral Concert will be on Tuesday Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium.

  • October 16Multicultural Club will have its first meeting on Monday Oct. 23 at 7:05 a.m. in room 205.

  • September 30American Sign Language Club meets on Thursdays at 3:30 p.m. in room 105.

  • September 30BPA meets Thursdays at 7:15 a.m. in the INCubator room.

  • September 30Medical Club will meet on Friday, Oct. 13.

  • September 30JSA a political debate club meets on Thursdays after school in room 236.

  • September 30Yearbook Club meets on Thursday mornings in room 216.

  • September 30R41N, a no-cut K-Pop dance club meets Wednesdays from 3:30 to 4:30 outside of room 219.

  • September 30The Central Times meetings will be held on Tuesdays at 7:10 a.m. in room 218.

  • September 30Truth Seekers will meet on Fridays to discuss various topics.

  • December 6Senior Panoramic Photo Wed, Dec. 14th 2nd hour in main gym. Order forms available next week at senior exits & Activities.

  • December 6Spring Musical, the Addams Family, auditions & informational workshop on Mon, Dec.12th in the choir room from 3:30-4pm.

  • December 6The Boys Bowling team will have its preseason meeting on Monday Oct. 23 at 3:30 p.m. in room 41.

  • December 6Freshman, join your Link Leaders' “Cocoa & Cram” sessions on Thurs. & next Tues. Meet outside of rm 100.

  • December 6Join Mickey Mouse Club before school thru Wednesday in rm. 221 to watch Lilo and Stitch.

  • December 6NCHS Show Choir Audition Workshops will be Friday, Dec. 16th 3:30-6pm and Monday, Dec. 19th 3:30-5pm in the Choir Room.

  • December 5Holiday Spirit Week – 12th-16th, Mon: Pj Day, Tues: White Out, Wed: Tacky Sweater Day, Thurs: Scarf & Socks, Fri: Candy Cane Day

  • December 5Holiday Toy Drive ends Dec. 13th. Drop off new toys valued at $10 - $20 in Activities, Main Office, or the Leaning Commons.

  • August 31Join the Central Times club meetings on Tuesday mornings at 7:15 in room 218

Professional athletes part of long-standing tradition of using platforms for politics

Photo source: John Dominis

Drew Kanne, Staff Writer

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Since the beginning of professional athletics, athletes have used their fame as a platform to incite political change. Though the causes have changed, the will to fight for what they believe has always remained. Some recent examples of this include NBA star Stephen Curry sharing his thoughts on the president and NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick sitting for the playing of the National Anthem.

The following is just a sample of political stances taken by athletes throughout the years.

The 1936 Olympics, held in Berlin, were both racially and politically charged. Adolf Hitler boasted that his Aryan race would beat any other country, including the African-American track star from the United States, Jesse Owens. Owens seemed to ignore Hitler’s blatantly racist statements as he brought four gold medals back to the United States.

In 1938, there was yet another triumph for African Americans over the Nazis with pro boxer Joe Louis’ victory against Aryan boxer Max Schmelin. The fight lasted just over two minutes, but had a huge impact on the way the black community was viewed.

Billie Jean King was one of the most prolific tennis players of all time. She fought for equality between men and women athletes throughout her career and was president of the Women’s Tennis Association. One of her greatest accomplishments both athletically, and to make a statement for equality, was beating the number one-ranked male tennis player Bobby Riggins in the 1973 Battle of the Sexes.

Muhammad Ali was always an activist for civil rights. A friend of fellow activist Malcolm X, Ali was outspoken when it came to fighting for and protecting civil rights. Ali also spoke out against the Vietnam war. He was drafted into the military but refused to serve. Because of this showing he was banned from boxing and even had some of his Olympic medals taken from him.

After the death of Trayvon Martin, the Miami Heat (at the time led by Lebron James and Dwyane Wade) posted an Instagram photo displaying the majority of the team with their heads bowed, wearing sweatshirts with their hands in their pockets, to mimic the clothing Martin was wearing when killed. The photo was captioned, “WeAreTrayvonMartin” also calling to bring Martin’s killer to justice.

In 2014 after the protests of the police shootings in Ferguson, Missouri, players on the St. Louis Rams decided to show their support. Tight end Jared Cook and wide receivers Kenny Britt, Tavon Austin, Stedman Bailey and Chris Givens stopped in the tunnel during pregame and put their hands in the air, the symbolic, “Hands up don’t shoot” gesture. According to ESPN, there was talk of the players being fined for the act, however the NFL decided against it.

Ever since athletes have been in the spotlight, they have used their talents to make statements for what they believe in. Athletes have always been working toward change.

As Trump’s presidency begins, the social advocacy is likely to continue.

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Professional athletes part of long-standing tradition of using platforms for politics