Album review: “Get Your Heart On-The Second Coming” by Simple Plan

Maggie Cody, Entertainment Editor

The second part of Simple Plan’s “Get Your Heart On” was released on Dec. 3. It’s apparent that they are moving further from their pop punk roots and more into generic pop.

“Get Your Heart On-The Second Coming” has many similarities to the first. The album starts with four upbeat songs about falling in and out of love, and not being ordinary. This is ironic, because these songs could not be more ordinary. I would not have been surprised if “The Rest of Us” featured the Jonas Brothers. With repetitive lyrics and over polished vocals, the message being sung becomes meaningless.

The final three songs made up for the lacking first half of the album. Simple Plan fans probably breathed a sigh of relief while listening to “In.” They had finally returned to their original sound, which is still pop but not overly edited like the previous songs.

The album concluded with two sad songs, which are essential to a Simple Plan album. “Lucky One” was all acoustic guitar. Meaningful lyrics sound as if they are sung straight from the heart in these songs. Ending the album with “Try” was a smart idea because they still sounded like themselves just with a twist.

Simple Plan is a pop band with punk qualities, but they have never gone to the extreme pop sound of the first three songs on “Get Your Heart On-The Second Coming.” If  they had arranged the album so the different types of songs were more evenly spread out, it would have been improved greatly. “In” should have been the first song because of it’s mixture of Simple Plan’s original sound and the new spin they are putting on the album, rather than completely diving into their new sound with “Ordinary Life.”

“Get Your Heart On-The Second Coming,” could be improved in a number of ways. While possibly frightening old fans with their new 100 percent pop sounding first songs, they could be trying to attract new audiences, which could be what they want because after all they do not want to live an “Ordinary Life.”