Central Retirees: Earl

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Central Retirees: Earl

Prem Chandrasekar, Staff Writer

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Q: How long have you been teaching at Central?

A: I am a special needs assistant and I have been an assistant for 14 years. My first year here I was a substitute teacher.

 

Q: Can you describe what it’s been like teaching at Central?

A: It’s very demanding, very draining. It takes everything you have because you’re constantly engaged with the students and dealing with their disabilities. dealing with their behavior.

You do get injured at times and you try to learn how to minimize those things because you still want to work with them. It’s still been very rewarding.

 

I mean they they they have a lot of classic books that they are exposed to. So and it’s. And which I thought was amazing that’s something to learn. You know you wouldn’t think that they would be able to but they may not get that much out of it but they do get something right. Yeah. So so do you have all the major classes and then they have art in the community. It’s always been is a challenge to take them out in a challenged the way they are. You know have people in the community react to them. Some people are positive and some people are negative because we have to be able control that behavior when they’re out. But but it’s good for them to get out and we’ve trying to do is make them as independent as they can.

 

Q: What has this school done for you?

A: I spent a lot of growth as a person. I’ve definitely changed. I’m not the same person when I came here. I think I’ve always been a nice person. You know you also become humble because you. Working with the students and thinking with their parents when they have to take them home what they go through it gives you just a realization of what life really is. If I didn’t do this, I would not have the same feelings about the world and life and being you know being happy with and of what I’ve what I have. You know you just don’t take it for granted that your children are normal. I spent a lot of growth as a person. I’ve definitely changed. I’m not the same person when I came here. I think I’ve always been a nice person. You know you also become humble because you. Working with the students and thinking with their parents when they have to take them home what they go through it gives you just a realization of what life really is. If you if I didn’t do this I would not have the same feelings about the world and life and being you know being happy with and of what I’ve what I have. You know you just don’t take it for granted that your children are normal.

 

Q: What are your future plans after retiring?

A: I want  to come back as a substitute teacher. I also want to work with my sorority when I graduated from Michigan State. I want to travel. I want to actually do some work and politics is a really good time. I would like to do work in social justice. I also want to spend more time with my family, with my grandchildren.

What are you gonna miss most about Central?

I’m going to miss the routine and coming in. I’m gonna miss the children and their faces and helping them. I’m gonna miss the teachers. I feel like we’re family here. I’m going to miss not just the special needs department but I’m gonna miss the whole school.

 

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